Primitive vs Reference Values in JavaScript

Whenever you create a variable in JavaScript, that variable can store one of two types of data, a primitive value or a reference value. If the value is a number, string, boolean, undefined, null, or symbol, it’s a primitive value. If it’s anything else (i.e. typeof object), it’s a reference value.

Primitive Values
  number
  string
  boolean
  undefined
  null
  symbol

Reference Values
  anything that is "typeof" "object"
    objects
    arrays
    functions
const age = 28 // primitive
const name = 'Tyler' // primitive
const loading = false // primitive
const user = undefined // primitive
const response = null // primitive
const counter = Symbol('counter') // primitive

const user = { name: 'Tyler' } // reference
const friends = ['Jake', 'Mikenzi'] // reference
const doThing = () => ({}) // reference

On the surface primitive values and reference values look the same, but under the hood they behave much differently. The key difference can be seen in how they store their value in memory. If you looked at the in-memory value of a primitive, you’d see the actual value itself (28, 'Tyler', false, etc). If you looked at the in-memory value of a reference type, you’d see a memory address (or a “reference” to a spot in memory). In practice though, what difference does it make? Let’s take a look at some examples.

let surname = 'McGinnis'
let displayName = surname

surname = 'Anderson'

console.log(surname) // 'Anderson'
console.log(displayName) // 'McGinnis'

First we create a variable called surname and assign the string McGinnis to it. Then we create a new variable called displayName and assign it to whatever the in-memory value of surname is, which happens to be McGinnis. From there we change the in-memory value of surname to be Anderson. Now, when we log surname we get Anderson and when we log displayName we get McGinnis. Though this example demonstrates that the in-memory value of a primitive is the value itself, there’s nothing surprising or really interesting going on here.

Let’s look at a similar example but instead of using a primitive value, let’s use a reference value.

let leo = {
  type: 'Dog',
  name: 'Leo'
}

let snoop = leo

snoop.name = 'Snoop'

console.log(leo.name) // Snoop
console.log(snoop.name) // Snoop

First we create a variable called leo and assign it to an object which has two properties, type and name. Then we create a new variable called snoop and assign it to whatever the in-memory value of leo is, which is the reference to the spot in memory where the leo object is located. At this point, both leo and snoop are referencing the same spot in memory. What that means is when we modify snoop.name, because snoop and leo are referencing the same spot in memory, it’s as if we also modified leo.name. That’s why when we log leo.name and snoop.name we get the same value, Snoop.

Let’s look at one more example to cement your understanding. What do you think happens when, using the identity operator (===), we compare two primitives that have the same value?

const name = 'Tyler'
const friend = 'Tyler'

name === friend // true

Here we see that because name and friend have the same value, Tyler, when comparing them, we get true. This probably seems obvious but it’s important to realize that the reason we get true is because, with the identity operator, primitives are compared by their value. Since both values equal Tyler, comparing them evaluates to true.

Now, what about reference values?

const leo = {
  type: 'Dog',
  name: 'Leo'
}

const leito = {
  type: 'Dog',
  name: 'Leo'
}

leo === leito // false

Even though leo and leito have the same properties and values, when comparing them with the identity operator, we get false. The reason for that is because, unlike primitive values, reference values are compared by their reference, or their location in memory. Above, even though leo and leito have the same properties and values, they’re occupying different locations in memory.

Both these examples demonstrate how primitive types are compared by their value while reference types are compared by their reference.


An interesting by-product of primitive values is that they’re always immutable. This make sense if you think of primitives in terms of their in-memory value. We said earlier that “if you looked at the in-memory value of a primitive, you’d see the actual value itself”. The reason primitive values are always immutable is because whenever you change a primitive value, what you’re actually doing is replacing the in-memory value. Because you can only replace the value and never modify it, by definition, that makes it immutable.

MDN summarizes this nicely.

“All primitives are immutable, i.e., they cannot be altered. It is important not to confuse a primitive itself with a variable assigned a primitive value. The variable may be reassigned a new value, but the existing value can not be changed in the ways that objects, arrays, and functions can be altered.”


One more thing

Hear me out - tired of boring JavaScript newsletters? Us too. That's why we made Bytes.

The goal was to create a JavaScript newsletter that was both insightful and entertaining. 40,000 subscribers later and well, reviews don't lie

I pinky promise you'll love it, but here are some recent issues so you can decide for yourself.

43,493 Subscribers. Every Monday.